Category Archives: Recipe

Potato Cakes

Baked Mash Potato Cakes

Ingredients (for 2 people)

  • 400g potatoes, peeled and rinsed
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon onion, finely chopped
  • Salt and fresh cracked pepper
  • 1 cup pancetta, or bacon, diced
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 1 tablespoons chives, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons breadcrumbs

Method

  1. Cook potatoes in plenty of salted water until cooked through. Meanwhile gently fry onion until translucent and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, combine potatoes, eggs, pancetta, onions, butter and chives. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Adjust the texture with a bit of milk if necessary.
  3. Preheat your oven to 190°C and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  4. On the baking sheet, using a ring mould, sprinkle a layer of breadcrumbs, then scoop potato mixture to shape the cakes, about 1.1/2 inch thick. Press down slightly with the back of a spatula and finish with another thin layer of breadcrumbs. Remove the ring mould and repeat the process.
  5. Bake in the oven at 190°C for 10 minutes, or until golden and serve warm.
  6. Note: You can add grated parmesan cheese on top of the potato cakes.
John Keegan

Mushy Peas

Mushy Peas

No need to buy mushy peas ever again!!

Ingredients

  • 200 gms of frozen peas
  • Knob of butter
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 tsps of mint sauce (or mint jelly)
  • Salt & Pepper

Method

  1. Add the peas to a small pan of boiling water. Cook for 4 minutes until really tender. Drain, tip into a bowl with the butter, zest and mint, and roughly mash with a potato masher. Season to taste and keep warm.
John Keegan

Kedgeree

Kedgeree

One of my favourite meals and so easy to warm up the next day with just two minutes in the microwave

Ingredients (for 4 people)

  • 475g/1lb 1oz undyed smoked haddock fillet, cut in half
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 200g/7oz basmati rice, rinsed in cold water and drained
  • 4 free-range eggs
  • 100g/3.1/2oz frozen peas (optional)
  • 40g/1.1/2oz butter
  • 1 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 heaped tbsp medium curry powder
  • 3 tbsp double cream
  • 3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. Place the haddock in a large frying pan, skin-side up. Pour over 500ml/17fl oz water, add the bay leaves and bring the water to a gentle simmer. Cook the fish for 8-10 minutes until it is just done and flakes easily. Drain in a colander set over a bowl, reserving the cooking liquor, and discard the bay leaves.
  2. Pour the cooking liquor into a medium saucepan and stir in the rice. Cover with a lid and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer the rice very gently for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and leave the rice covered for 3-5 minutes more. By this time it should have absorbed all the fish liquor.
  3. While the rice is cooking, bring some water to the boil in a medium pan. Add the eggs and cook for eight minutes. Drain them in a sieve under cold running water and when cool enough to handle, peel them carefully and set aside. Cook the peas, if using, in a small pan of boiling water and drain.
  4. Melt the butter with the oil in a large pan and cook the onion over a low hear for five minutes until well softened, stirring occasionally. Add the curry powder and cook for another 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Place the cooked rice into the pan and stir in the onions. Add the peas, cream, parsley and a few twists of ground black pepper.
  5. Flake the fish into chunky pieces and add these to the pan. Gently stir the lemon juice and cook for 1-2 minutes. Cut the eggs into quarters and place them on the rice. Cover the pan with a lid and heat through for 2-3 minutes or until the eggs are warm, then serve.
  6. If not serving immediately, tip the kedgeree into a warm dish and dot with a few cubes of butter. Cover with foil and keep warm in a low oven for up to 20 minutes before serving.

John Keegan

Crêpes Suzette

Classic crêpes suzette

Ingredients For the crepes (6)

  • 110g/4oz plain flour, sifted
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 200ml/7fl oz milk mixed with 75ml/3fl oz water
  • 50g/2oz butter
  • 1 medium orange, grated zest only
  • 1 tbsp caster sugar

For the sauce

  • 150ml/5fl oz orange juice (from 3-4 medium oranges)
  • 1 medium orange, grated zest only
  • 1 small lemon, grated rind and juice
  • tbsp caster sugar
  • tbsp Grand Marnier, Cointreau or brandy
  • 50g/2oz unsalted butter
  • a little extra Grand Marnier, for flaming

Method

  1. Sift the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl with a sieve held high above the bowl so the flour gets an airing. Now make a well in the centre of the flour and break the eggs into it. Then begin whisking the eggs – any sort of whisk or even a fork will do – incorporating any bits of flour from around the edge of the bowl as you do so.
  2. Next gradually add small quantities of the milk and water mixture, still whisking (don’t worry about any lumps as they will eventually disappear as you whisk). When all the liquid has been added, use a rubber spatula to scrape any elusive bits of flour from around the edge into the centre, then whisk once more until the batter is smooth, with the consistency of thin cream. Now melt the 50g/2oz of butter in a pan. Spoon 2 tbsp of it into the batter and whisk it in, then pour the rest into a bowl and use it to lubricate the pan, using a wodge of kitchen paper to smear it round before you make each pancake. Stir the orange zest and caster sugar into the batter.
  3. Now get the pan really hot, then turn the heat down to medium and, to start with, do a test pancake to see if you’re using the correct amount of batter. These little crepes should be thinner than the basic pancakes, so when you’re making them, use ½ tbsp of batter at a time in a 18cm/7in pan. It’s also helpful if you spoon the batter into a ladle so it can be poured into the hot pan in one go. As soon as the batter hits the hot pan, tip it around from side to side to get the base evenly coated with batter. It should take only half a minute or so to cook; you can lift the edge with a palette knife to see if it’s tinged gold as it should be. Flip the pancake over with a pan slice or palette knife – the other side will need a few seconds only – then simply slide it out of the pan onto a plate. If the pancakes look a little bit ragged in the pan, no matter because they are going to be folded anyway. You should end up with 15-16 crepes.
  4. Stack the pancakes as you make them between sheets of greaseproof paper on a plate fitted over simmering water, to keep them warm while you make the rest.
  5. For the sauce, mix all the ingredients – with the exception of the butter – in a bowl. At the same time warm the plates on which the crepes are going to be served. Now melt the butter in the frying pan, pour in the sauce and allow it to heat very gently. Then place the first crepes in the pan and give it time to warm through before folding it in half and then in half again to make a triangular shape. Slide this onto the very edge of the pan, tilt the pan slightly so the sauce runs back into the centre, then add the next crepe. Continue like this until they’re all re-heated, folded and well soaked with the sauce.

You can flame them at this point if you like. Heat a ladle by holding it over a gas flame or by resting it on the edge of a hotplate, then, away from the heat, pour a little liqueur or brandy into it, return it to the heat to warm the spirit, then set light to it. Carry the flaming ladle to the table over the pan and pour the flames over the crepes before serving on the warmed plates

John Keegan